One of the best parts about living where I do, is that there's lots of wildlife. Turkeys, deer, hawks, bald eagles, coyotes, and of course owls. Mostly Barred Owls naturally. This year though, was the first time I'd ever heard a snowy owl. I haven't seen it yet, but I always try to track down bird calls online when I hear a new one.

And honestly, I'm not sure I want to see it. Well, maybe if I'm lucky enough to catch sight of one out my window. Here's the thing.... It's mating season. And on top of that, thanks to a banner mating year, there are waaay more snowy owls than usual. With colder air to the north, they've been making their way down as far as Maine more than usual.

And of course, everyone is all excited about them and has snowy owl fever because one was very publicly rescued and brought to a bird rehab. A law enforcement official saved one, and it was all over the news. So attention to snowy owls is on high right now. And it's this that concerns folks from the Maine Audubon Society, according to WMTW - TV8.

It would be a shame to disturb the owls during their breeding season by getting too close to them. That's not to say anyone means them any harm, but if you get to close it will absolutely spook the birds. Which could definitely disturb their natural cycle. Maine Audubon staff naturalist Doug Hitchcox said this to WMTW...

That can be as simple as the bird just looking at you. I often think of when a snowy owl turns his head and makes eye contact with you, that's a sign that you are too close and immediately start backing up.

Some online forums have even banned photos of snowy owls for fear of people getting too close. So, let's just do our part to keep these awesome birds safe. They are indeed beautiful, but they also need privacy to do their business. The least we can do is back off while these majestic raptors get their brown chicken-brown cow going. Amirite?!

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